Healing Discussion Podcast #9

Getting back together after only a few days to start digging into Blackrock Foundry healing.  We talk about both interesting healing details at some of the encounters in early Blackrock, and how they raise various general principles of setting up a healing team.

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0:00 – Intro
1:05 – Set Bonus discussion Follow-up
>1:20 – Mistweaver 2pc (Serpent Stance) applies MS bonus to instants
>6:15 – Discipline Priest 2pc and value of a Penance tick
10:15 – our Blackrock Foundry WeakAuras project
13:00 – BRF Encounter thoughts
>13:45 – Gruul & understanding a damage profile
>21:40 – Oregorger & mitigating Acid Torrent
>26:30 – Flamebender Ka’graz & the value of stacking the raid for healing
>32:20 – Hans’gar & Franzok & Bloodlust/Heroism on a %hp-based fight (my post on use of Bloodlust)
>39:50 – Operator Thogar &  Bloodlust/Heroism on a time-based fight
>45:10 – Beastlord Darmac & dropping healers
>59:15 – Kromog & adding healers
1:08:10 – DPS vs Survivability, revisiting the Butcher discussion (at 41:30), and Versatility
1:16:15 – Outro

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Healing Discussion Podcast #8

Dayani and I have both been occupied with various projects lately, particularly her raid guides and my challenge mode video guides.  But we finally got back together to catch up on healing, and spent most of the time on a topic we hadn’t gotten into yet, T17 set bonuses.

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0:00 – Intro & What we’ve been up to
1:30 – New Patch 6.1 Notes — Updated HealerCalcs
1:45 – PW:S nerf, and what it does for Disc Priest priorities
8:15 – Resto Shaman’s Restorative Waters buff
12:30 – PoM charge change reverted
13:20 – Crane Stance/Rising Sun Kick buff
18:45 – Challenge Mode difficulty
21:00 – Tier 17 Set Bonuses
23:00 – Shaman Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
31:20 – Druid Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
39:50 – Holy Priest Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
45:00 – Disc Priest Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
56:00 – Paladin Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
1:06:10 – Mistweaver Monk Set Bonuses (2pc 4pc)
1:16:00 – Good-bye!

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Raid Awareness, Applied: Blackrock Foundry Edition

If you read this blog, you’ve hopefully seen my post on how I think about raid awareness.  I’ve always wondered exactly how to follow up on it, and while this post isn’t nearly so broad in scope, it’s way of trying to revisit that topic.  I’m not introducing any fundamentally new ideas, but rather, using Blackrock Foundry as an example of how those ideas can be applied.  This post tries to make it as easy as possible to implement some of the most important and universal UI techniques for yourself.

WeakAura Downloads

In some cases I included WeakAuras I built so that you can try them out with a minimum of effort.  I got Dayani (who researched the BRF fights in extreme detail in order to prepare her set of guides) to work on a list of boss abilities with me, and think about the best way to handle each one.

If you do nothing else upon reading this post, try installing these Auras–your raid leader will be happy with the outcome.  All you have to do is download the addon and import these two strings:

BRF – Debuff Alert and Standing In Fire (v 0.91) (for everyone): Link

BRF – Interrupt Bars (v 0.91) (for interrupters): Link

(These are substantially complete, but we’ve only been able to do limited testing on our own, and I expect to make some tweaks after people try them out and provide any suggestions or problems)

Thus far it includes Heroic difficulty Blackrock Foundry.  An added module for Mythic is something we hope to do after finalizing this one.

3/3: v.0.91:

  • Exported from newest WeakAuras (2.1)
  • Alert for standing in someone else’s Blazing Radiance disabled until I figure out a way to prevent it from firing erroneously
  • Some debuffs split into their own aura with manually-selected icon, since “Automatic Icon” didn’t seem to be picking them up correctly.  Please report more of these if you see them.
  • No changes to Interrupt Bars.

The Big Debuff Alert

This component is the one example of completely universal raid UI that I illustrated in the raid awareness article.  You should want everyone in your raid to have it, and in fact a big motivation of this project was simply to increase uptake by handing over a WeakAura, or at least a debuff list, that people could use.  I split it into two parts: 1) encounter-specific debuffs that require immediate movement and 2) the specific situation of “standing in fire”.  In both cases, the concept is as described in the article: if any of these is happening to you, a UI that makes it possible for you to miss or ignore that fact is inadequate.

Both parts are in the first Aura I linked above.  I’ll address the specific-debuff module first.

The Aura pops up a giant icon like this when you have any of the listed debuffs:

WoWScrnShot_021615_150754

If someone in your raid didn’t move out with this debuff, they probably didn’t have this alert.

 

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Quick Notes on Efficient use of Bloodlust

You probably hear this all the time for various encounters, especially from DPS: “Bloodlust at the start of the fight, because everyone’s standing still and [some mechanic] isn’t happening yet, so you get the best DPS value out of it.”  This post is slightly tricky because I want to talk about 1) a subtle fallacy here (that Bloodlust is inherently better at times when raid DPS is higher), while also noting that, 2) in the end, it often is correct to use it at the start of the encounter (because it will have the strongest intersection with everyone’s cooldowns and trinkets).

There are two reasons that (1) can be incorrect.  First, it can be more important to get through a hard phase of the fight faster than to end the whole fight more quickly.  This is important but I’m not going to get into it too much here.  It’s generally well-recognized and, when Bloodlust isn’t used at the start, this is typically the reason.  What’s more interesting and counterintuitive though is that using Bloodlust when the raid’s doing the most DPS isn’t even necessarily best for ending the fight quickly.

How is that possible?  It’s (roughly speaking) a uniform %-based DPS increase.  It’s most valuable when the underlying damage is the highest! (You might be saying).

Basic Example

Say you have a 2-phase encounter.  Phase 1 goes until 50%.  It does nothing–it’s a target dummy and the raid does its maximum DPS (our hypothetical encounter designer is very amenable to setting up weird examples for me).  Phase 2 has lots of abilities that interfere with DPS, movement and the like.  Say the raid does half of its maximum DPS here.  The boss has 20 million HP and the raid’s maximum DPS is 100,000.  And forget about potions and trinkets etc. for the moment (I’m keeping things very abstract and continuous for now, but will revisit some of these assumptions below).

  • Without Bloodlust: P1 takes 100 seconds, and P2 (at half DPS) takes 200 seconds.  Boss dies in 300 seconds.
  • With Bloodlust in P1: the raid does 130,000 DPS for 40 seconds, doing 5.2 million damage.  The remaining 4.8 million of P1 take 48 seconds.  P2 still takes 200 seconds.  Boss dies in 288 seconds.
  • With Bloodlust in P2: at the start of P2, the raid does 65,000 DPS for 40 seconds, doing 2.6 million damage.  The remaining 7.4 million damage of P2 takes 148 seconds.  P1 still took 100 seconds.  Boss dies in 288 seconds.

“Ok Hamlet,” you might say, “what kind of math voodoo is this?  Bloodlust to add 15000 DPS for the 40s duration is equally effective as Bloodlust to add 30,000 DPS for the 40s duration?”

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